Apple Rhubarb Jam

  • 5 cups chopped rhubarb
  • 5 cups apples, peeled, cored and roughly chopped
  • 2 cups sugar
  • Juice of one large lemon

Put 3-4 spoons in the freezer for your jam test later on.

Also, when making jam, try not to fill the pot more than 1-2 inches from the bottom of the pan. Jam needs room to bubble up while it cooks so the water can evaporate.

Bring rhubarb, apples, sugar and lemon to a boil, then reduce to medium and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until fruit is soft. Use a stick blender midway through to chop up the fruit a little, making sure to leave lots of big chunks for texture,

Then, when the fruit is cooked and the foam has subsided, scoop up some jam on one of the frozen spoons and put it in the freezer for 3-4 minutes. If the jam is still too runny, just keep cooking it and doing the frozen spoon test until the jam sets.

Ladle into sterilized jars, top with lids, then process jars in a hot water bath for 10 minutes, making sure the jars are covered by least 2 inches of water.

BTW: For great jam-making tips, see this wonderful article.

French Apple Jam

  • 25  apples
  • 8 cups sugar
  • 20 cardamom pods, crushed (use a spoon to crack open the pods to release the seeds)
  • 5 lemons, juice and zest 

Peel, core, and roughly chop the apples. Throw them in a large pot with the sugar, cardamom seeds, and the lemon juice and zest. Stir well, then bring to a boil and cook uncovered over medium high heat for 30-40 minutes until thickened.

About halfway through the cooking, use a stick blender to blend the jam a bit, but leave  lots of apple chunks intact for a nice, chunky texture. 

Ladle the hot jam into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rim, center lid on jar, apply band until  fingertip tight, then process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes

Blueberry Jam

  • 10 cups fresh blueberries
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 a lemon

Yield: Two 500 ml jars of jam.

Use your largest pot when making jam. It needs to be big enough so that the fruit goes no more than 1-2 inches up the sides of the pot. If you want to double the batch, use two pots – one pot for each batch of jam. Otherwise, your jam might not thicken up.

Put the blueberries in the pot on low, then heat the fruit slowly until a gentle boil is reached.

Add the sugar and lemon juice, then cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until a teaspoon of hot jam sets on a cold plate (see below), about 20-25 minutes.

Just make sure you keep stirring the jam as it cooks or it will burn, especially in the last stages of cooking.


Cold Plate Test for Jam

Put 3-4 small plates into the freezer when you start cooking the jam.

When you think the jam is almost ready, take one of the plates from the freezer and spoon some hot jam on the cold plate. Tip the plate to one side. If mixture is thin and pours off the plate, it’s not ready yet. The jam should be thick and run slowly along the plate.


Preparing Jars and Lids

While the jam is cooking, prepare your jars and lids. To do so, fill a large pot or canning kettle with enough water to fully immerse your jars in 1 inch of water.

Bring jars to a boil, then reduce to medium, keeping everything at a nice gentle boil while you wait for the jam to finish cooking. Pre-heating the lids and rings is not necessary.


Canning

When the jam is ready, remove the jars from the hot water by inserting a wooden spoon or tongs into the jars then tipping the water out as you lift the jars out of the pot.

Place an open-mouthed jar funnel into the top of the jar, then pour the jam into the jar through the funnel, leaving a ¼’ of space at the top of each jar for expansion.  If you spill jam on the rim of the jar, wipe it clean with a damp paper towel – not a kitchen cloth as it may not be sterile.

Put a lid on the jar and tighten it (not too tight), then put the jar back into the hot water using the jar lifters.

Continue with the rest of the jars until all the jam is done, then boil the jars for 5 minutes. Make sure the water covers the jars by 1 to 2 inches during processing.

Remove jars from hot water with the jar lifters and set on a tea towel to cool. You will hear cheerful popping sounds as the jars cool down- this is normal and means that the jars are properly sealed.

Enjoy your beautiful jam on freshly baked bread, baguette or croissants – or simply on a spoon, straight out of the jar.

 

Rhubarb Strawberry Jam

  • 7 cups rhubarb, chopped
  • 7 cups strawberries, sliced
  • 9 cups white sugar
  • ½ cup lemon juice


Equipment

  • Large pot or canning kettle
  • Six 8 ounce canning jars with lids and rings
  • Wooden spoon or tongs
  • Wide-mouthed jar funnel
  • Jar lifter

 

How to

Mix rhubarb, strawberries, sugar and lemon juice in a large pot and let stand for at least 2 hours.

Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat, stirring frequently, then cook on medium-high at a gentle boil until a teaspoon of hot jam sets on a cold plate (see below), about 40-50 minutes.

Cold Plate Test for Jam

Put 3-4 small plates into the freezer when you start cooking the jam.

When you think the jam is almost ready, take one of the plates from the freezer and spoon some jam on the cold plate. Tip the plate to one side. If mixture is thin and just pours off the plate, it’s not ready yet. The jam should be thick and run slowly along the plate.


Preparing Jars and Lids

While the jam is cooking, prepare your jars and lids. To do so, fill a large pot or canning kettle with enough water to fully immerse your jars in 1 inch of water.

Bring jars to a boil, then reduce to medium, keeping everything at a nice gentle boil while you wait for the jam to finish cooking.

Pre-heating the lids and rings is not necessary.


Canning

When the jam is ready, skim of any remaining foam, then remove the jars from the hot water by inserting a wooden spoon or tongs into the jars then tipping the water out as  you lift the jars out of the pot.

Place an open-mouthed jar funnel into the top of the jar, then pour the jam into the jar through the funnel, leaving a ¼’ of space at the top of each jar for expansion.  If you spill jam on the rim of the jar, wipe it clean with a damp paper towel – not a kitchen cloth as it may not be sterile.

Put a lid on the jar and tighten it (not too tight), then put the jar back into the hot water using the jar lifters.

Continue with the rest of the jars until all the jam is done, then boil the jars for 5 minutes. Make sure the water covers the jars by 1 to 2 inches during processing.

Remove jars from hot water with the jar lifters and set on a tea towel to cool. You will hear cheerful popping sounds as the jars cool down- this is normal and means that the jars are properly sealed.

Enjoy your beautiful jam on freshly baked homemade bread, baguette or croissants.